Information Page on
the West Nile Virus in the Northeast

Summer '01 Mosquito Prevention
Summer 2001 OC Precautions
Spring 2001 Mosquitoes in Yards
Spring 2001 Outdoor Workers
10/28 Grouse in Little Falls
10/28 Grouse in Forestport
10/23 Crow in Town of Kirkland
9/29 Crow in Boonville
9/28 Three Birds Positive
9/22 Crow in Verona
9/20 Crow in New Hartford
9/15 Rock Dove in Utica
9/14 Bluejay in Town of Kirkland
9/8 Status Report on WNV
9/4 Sylvan Beach Reopened
9/5 Rome Spraying Postponed!
Verona State/Sylvan Beach Closed
What to do if you Find a Bird?
ANVIL FAQ's * DEET FAQ's
What is West Nile Virus?
DEET Protection Tips
9/1/00 Notice for Rome area
No spraying until 9/6/00
King Fisher in Westmoreland
Blue Jay in Town of Verona
Hawk in City of Rome
Community Events Continue
Town of Marcy Spraying
Spraying for West Nile in Utica
Health Dept Plan for Spraying

 



Summer 2001 Mosquito Prevention

This is the time of year when mosquoitoes are out in force, and may spread diseases, including West Nile virus. It's a good idea to police your yard for standing water that can provide a breeding ground. Remove or turn over vessels that hold water, including wheelbarrows, unused pots and trays beneath containers. Flush out bird baths regularly.

Mosquitoes can breed in unlikely locations – a bottle cap filled with water, leaf debris or clogged rain gutters, discarded tires. Clear clogged gutters, which can hold water. Treat ponds with Bt drinks, which kill mosquito larvae without hamming desired aquatic life, including fish. A thorough clean up will help lower the risk of being bitten by a mosquito.

 


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Summer 2001 Update & Precautions

Beginning Monday, June 18, 2001 Oneida County Health Department staff began setting CDC light traps and Gravid traps for mosquitoes in several locations throughout Oneida County. Pools of mosquitoes captured in these traps were submitted to Albany to be tested for the presence of West Nile Virus. Results will be made available as they are received by the Health Department.

Larval surveillance has also been performed in areas near stagnant water. This will allow Health Department officials to determine the presence of particular mosquito species that may play a role in the transmission of West Nile Virus.Health Department staff, in conjunction with other agencies as appropriate, are investigating potential mosquito breeding habitats noted last summer and those reported thus far this season to the Health Department. Several areas have been investigated, and as the weather warms up, will be inspected again for mosquito larvae.

The Health Department is continuing to send dead birds to the New York State Department of Health for testing. No positive tests from Oneida County have been reported yet. Bird submissions and results are shown in the following table.

West Nile Virus is transmitted by particular species of mosquito. Property owners can minimize the risk to themselves and their neighbors by finding and eliminating sites where mosquitoes breed. This does not just apply to businesses and homeowners who live near water.

As the warm weather continues, mosquitoes will become more prevalent. It is important to take clean-up action now to curb the spread of West Nile Virus as much as possible.

The Oneida County Health Department requests the assistance of the public in reporting potential breeding sites due to standing water that residents see on public lands or on abandoned properties. Contact the Health Department at 798-5064.

Dead crows or jays could be a sign of West Nile Virus, but it is important to remember that West Nile Virus has killed not all dead birds. Contact the Oneida County Health Department at 798-5064 to report dead crows and jays. Not all birds can or should be picked up for testing.



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About Mosquitoes and Your Yard

Mosquitoes are small flying insects that feed on human and animal blood or plant juices. Only female mosquitoes bite to get a blood meal for their growing eggs. Mosquitoes are generally considered a nuisance pest, but occasionally can transmit disease.

There are about 65 different species of mosquitoes in New York State. To date, the Culex pipiens (the Northern house mosquito) and Aedes japonicus species are the only mosquitoes in New York State associated with West Nile virus, an infection that can cause encephalitis.

Culex mosquitoes lay their eggs in stagnant water around the home. They can develop in any stagnant water that lasts more than 4 days. Weeds, tall grass and shrubbery provide an outdoor home for adult Culex mosquitoes, which may also enter houses through unscreened windows or doors, or broken screens. Aedes japonicus mosquitoes, like Culex, often breed in discarded tires.

Culex mosquitoes are most active between dusk and dawn when the air is calm, and that is when the females are most likely to bite. However, they may be present at any time of the day. Aedes japonicus mosquitoes feed during the daytime and at dusk.

You can and should reduce your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes:

  • Reduce or eliminate all stagnant water in your yard;
  • Make sure all windows and doors have screens; and,
  • Keep all screens repaired.

How many breeding sites can you find?

  • Clogged gutters accumulate water and create a place for mosquitoes to breed.
  • Mosquitoes will breed in any untreated water.
  • Poorly maintained ponds & swimming pools can be mosquitoe breeding sites.
  • Uncovered refuse containers & junk piles collect water in which mosquitoes can breed.
  • Such items as tires and gardening tools, when filled with water, can breed mosquitoes.
  • Do not rake leaves and other yard waste into the gutter or storm drain because it prevents water from flowing and creates ponds that give mosquitoes a place to lay eggs and develop.
  • Crawl spaces, attic vents and broken screens allow mosquitoes to enter your home.
  • Leaky faucets provide water in which mosquitoes can breed.

Paying attention to these details will help in the containment of the West Nile Virus.



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About Mosquitoes and Outdoor Workers

Do I need to change my safety practices when working outdoors?

It is not necessary to limit your usual outdoor work or change standard outdoor work safety and health practices, unless there is evidence of mosquito-borne disease in the area where you are working. Workers can help reduce mosquito-breeding areas by making sure that wheelbarrows, buckets, and other containers are turned upside down when not being used so that they do not collect standing water.

What if the West Nile virus is identified in the area where I am working outdoors?

Even in areas where mosquitoes do carry the virus, very few mosquitoes--less than 1 percent--are infected. The chance that any one bite will be from an infected mosquito is very small. You can reduce your risk of disease, by reducing mosquito bites.

Precautions that you can follow to help reduce the risk of mosquito bites include:

Wearing shoes, socks, long pants, and a long-sleeved shirt when outdoors for long periods of time, or when mosquitoes are most active between dusk and dawn.

Using mosquito repellent according to label directions when it is necessary to be outdoors for long periods of time or when mosquitoes are most active.
Most repellent products contain the active ingredients permethrin or DEET. Permethrin-containing products can be used only on clothing, not skin, and must be used with caution. DEET is an insect repellent that can reduce the risk of mosquito bites, but it must be used with caution. Be aware of the possible adverse health effects when making decisions about DEET. Products containing DEET have been associated with some health problems such as skin reactions and eye irritations.

The NYS Department of Health recommends the following precautions when using products containing DEET:

  • Avoid prolonged and excessive use of DEET.
  • Do NOT apply insect repellents in enclosed areas.
  • Do NOT apply directly on your face.
  • Apply ONLY to exposed skin and NOT to skin covered by clothing.
  • Wash clothing separately and wash all treated skin after returning indoors.
  • DEET can be applied to clothing, but it may damage some synthetic fabrics and plastics.

How can I avoid heat stress on hot, humid days?

If you wear a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks to reduce the risk of mosquito bites, you might be at greater risk for heat stress on hot, humid days. To avoid symptoms of heat stress, you should:

  • Wear light-colored, breathable clothing that allows moisture to evaporate quickly.
  • Use extra caution if you are required to wear clothing on the job that limits evaporation--you could develop heat stress much more quickly.
  • Drink plenty of non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated liquids to maintain body hydration.

Can I get West Nile Virus from handling dead animals?

There is no evidence that West Nile Virus can be spread directly from animals to people. However, gloves should be worn whenever dead animals must be handled.

What can I do to reduce my exposure to pesticides?

As with any pesticide, you should avoid any unnecessary exposure. Although spraying to eliminate adult mosquitoes has not been ruled out--individual counties will make spraying decisions according to their individual needs--such measures will be used only as a last resort.

Some precautions that you can take to minimize pesticide exposure, if spraying does occur, include:

  • Avoid eye contact with the spray if you have to be outside. If you do get pesticides in your eyes, rinse them immediately with water.
  • Wash any clothing that may have come into contact with the spray separate from other clothing.
  • Wash exposed skin surfaces with soap and water if you come into contact with spray or treated surfaces.

What about pesticide handlers and applicators?

Applicators of restricted-use pesticides in NYS must be certified by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation or must work under the supervision of a certified applicator. The certification program includes training on the proper handling and use of pesticides. Information on the pesticide label must be followed regarding use of protective measures and equipment.

Public sector workers in NYS must also receive information, training, and education about toxic substances in the workplace in accordance with the NYS "Right to Know" Law. Requirements for using respiratory and personal protective equipment are also enforced by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for private sector workers and by the NYS Department of Labor’s Public Employee Safety and Health (PESH) program for public sector workers in NYS.



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West Nile-Positive Crow in Little Falls

The Oneida County Health Department was notified this morning, Wednesday, October 25, 2000 by the State Health Department that a hatchling ruffled grouse found in Little Falls tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with Town officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.

The Oneida County Health Department continues to monitor the situation and will release information as it develops and encourages residents to continue precautions such as wearing long sleeves and insect repellant and to eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.


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West Nile-Positive Crow in Forestport

The Oneida County Health Department was notified this morning, Wednesday, October 25, 2000 by the State Health Department that a hatchling ruffled grouse found October 3, 2000 near Kayuta Campground and Bartwell Mills Roads in the Town of Forestport tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with Town of Forestport officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.

The Oneida County Health Department continues to monitor the situation and will release information as it develops and encourages residents to continue precautions such as wearing long sleeves and insect repellant and to eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.


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West Nile-Positive Crow in Town of Kirkland

The Oneida County Health Department was notified this morning, Monday, October 23, 2000 by the State Health Department that a juvenile Crow found September 27, 2000 near Chestnut and Foundtain Streets in the Town of Kirkland tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with Town of Boonville officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.

The Oneida County Health Department continues to monitor the situation and will release information as it develops and encourages residents to continue precautions such as wearing long sleeves and insect repellant and to eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.


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West Nile-Positive Crow in Boonville

The Oneida County Health Department was notified this morning, Friday, September 29, 2000 by the State Health Department that a juvenile Crow found near the corner of Post and West Streets in the Town of Boonville September 14, 2000 tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with Town of Boonville officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.

The Oneida County Health Department continues to monitor the situation and will release information as it develops and encourages residents to continue precautions such as wearing long sleeves and insect repellant and to eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.


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Three Birds Test Positive for West Nile Virus

The Oneida County Health Department was notified this morning, Thursday, September 28, 2000 by the State Health Department that three birds found in Oneida County tested positive for the West Nile virus.

An adult Crow found near the intersection of Turin and Potters Roads in the City of Rome on September 15, 2000. An adult Ruffed Grouse, a local bird, found near the intersection of Ronald and Linda Drives in the Town of Marcy on September 18, 2000. A juvenile Ruffed Grouse found near Harding and College Hill Road in the Village of Clinton on September 19.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with Village of Clinton, Town of Marcy and City of Rome officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.

The Oneida County Health Department continues to monitor the situation and will release information as it develops and encourages residents to continue precautions such as wearing long sleeves and insect repellant and to eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.


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West Nile-Positive Crow in Town of Verona

The Oneida County Health Department was notified late this morning, Friday, September 22, 2000 by the State Health Department that a Crow hatchling found near the intersection of Sand Hill Road and Route 31 in the Town of Verona tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with Town of Verona officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.

The Oneida County Health Department continues to monitor the situation and will release information as it develops and encourages residents to continue precautions such as wearing long sleeves and insect repellant and to eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.


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West Nile-Positive Crow in Town of New Hartford

The Oneida County Health Department was notified late this morning, Wednesday, September 20, 2000 by the State Health Department that an adult Crow found near the intersection of Merritt Place and Hillside Avenue in the Town of New Hartford on September 8, 2000 tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with Town of New Hartford officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.

Oneida County Health Department officials said that birds in the location where the Crow was found have been observed with flight patterns extending for many miles and they are not ruling out the possibility that the bird could have been infected elsewhere.


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West Nile-Positive Rock Dove in Utica

It was reported on Friday, September 15, by the State Health Department, that a Rock Dove found near Elm and Steuben Streets in the city of Utica, tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with City of Utica officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes, and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.

Previous aerial spraying for the City of Utica was between Aug 28 - Aug 30, 2000, but health officials said it takes about 5-15 days for a bird that is infected with West Nile by a mosquito to develop symptoms or to die from the virus. Therefore, the Health Department believes the Rock Dove found was infected prior to Utica spraying.



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West Nile-Positive Bluejay in Town of Kirkland

It was reported on Thursday, September 14, by the State Health Department, that a bluejay found near Old Bristol Road and Route 5 in the Town of Kirkland, tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Oneida County Health Department is in discussions with Town of Kirkland officials about a short-term and long-term response. However, because of changes in the weather that reduce the activity of mosquitoes, and hence the potential spread of the West Nile virus to humans, the County has suspended spraying operations.



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Rome Spraying for West Nile Virus Postponed

9/5/00 It has been reported that Aerial Spraying for Mosquitoes for West Nile Virus in Rome, Wednesday, September 6, 2000, has been Postponed indefinitely, due to a frost advisory that is in effect for this evening.



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Sylvan Beach Reopened, Verona Still Closed

9/3/00 It has been reported that Sylvan Beach will be reopened for Monday Sept 4th, Labor Day, but Verona State Park is still closed.



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Verona State Park & Sylvan Beach Closed

9/1/00 It has been reported that 100,000 to 150,000 gallons of untreated sewage was discharged from the City of Oneida Wastewater Treatment Facility into the Oneida Creek due to mechanical failure of a pump.

Because the creek flows into the Oneida Lake and the pollution may threaten the beaches at Verona State Park and Sylvan Beach, these beaches are closed until water sampling and testing have been completed.

People using water for recreational purposes from Oneida Lake near Marion Manor to Sylvan Beach are advised that such use should be restricted until the public beaches reopen in the area. People living in the above mentioned area should not use water from Oneida Lake for any other purpose until the beaches reopen.


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What to do if you find a Dead Bird

If you find a dead bird and suspect The West Nile Virus, contact the Oneida County Environmental Health Department at 315-798-5064, or Herkimer County Public Health at 315-867-1430, or Department of Environmental Conservation at 315-785-2263, or U.S. Wildlife Disease Specialists at 608-270-2445.


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DEET Frequently Asked Questions

The chemical N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide ­ more commonly known as DEET ­ is an insect repellent that can reduce the risk of mosquito bites, but must be used with caution. Products containing DEET have been occasionally associated with some health problems (skin reactions, including rash, swelling and itching; eye irritation; and, less frequently, slurred speech, confusion and seizures). Frequent application or saturation may not be necessary. Use as you need for your situation.

In addition, it is recommended that you take these precautions when using repellents that contain DEET:
* Store out of the reach of children and read all instructions on the label before applying.
* Do NOT allow children to apply DEET themselves.
* Do NOT apply DEET directly to children. Apply to your own hands and then put it on the child. (According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, repellents used on children should contain no more than 10 percent DEET.)
* When applying DEET, avoid the child's face and hands.
* Avoid prolonged and excessive use of DEET. Use sparingly to cover exposed skin only. (There is no need to treat unexposed skin).
* Do NOT apply repellents in enclosed areas.
* Do NOT apply directly on your face.
* DEET may be applied to clothing, but may damage some synthetic fabrics and plastics.
* Wash treated skin and clothing after returning indoors.
* If you believe you or a child is having an adverse reaction to a repellent containing DEET, wash the treated area immediately and contact your health care provider or local poison control center.

Remember that the use of DEET is only one way to reduce the risk of mosquito bites. Other precautions are to wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts when in areas of high mosquito activity. Also, eliminate items on your property in which stagnant water can collect and serve as a breeding ground for mosquitoes.


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Frequently Asked Questions About West Nile Virus

West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne infection that can cause encephalitis. Although chances of a person getting encephalitis are small, there are some simple steps you can take to reduce your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes.

What is encephalitis? Encephalitis is a viral infection. Mild cases may include a slight fever and/or headache. More severe infections are marked by a rapid onset of a high fever with head and body aches. Usually symptoms occur from 5 to 15 days after exposure. There is no specific treatment for viral infections, other than to treat the symptoms and provide supportive care. Those who may be most susceptible to encephalitis are infants, the elderly and persons with damaged immune systems.

Do all mosquitoes transmit disease? No. Most mosquitoes do not transmit disease. While there are about 65 different species of mosquitoes in New York State, the Culex pipiens mosquito (the common house mosquito) is the one most commonly associated with West Nile virus.

Where do mosquitoes live and breed? Mosquitoes lay their eggs in stagnant water. The eggs hatch and remain in the water until the adults mature and fly off. Weeds, tall grass and shrubbery provide an outdoor home for adult Culex mosquitoes. They can also enter houses through unscreened windows or doors, or broken screens.

When are mosquitoes most active? Culex mosquitoes are most active between dusk and dawn, when the air is calm. However, they may be present at any time of day.

What bird(s)can carry West Nile virus? Although most West Nile virus-positive birds have been American crows, infections also have been confirmed in other species, including the rock dove, sandhill crane, fish crow, blue jay, bald eagle, laughing gull, black- crowned night heron, mallard, American robin, pigeon, red-tailed hawk, flamingo, herring gull, cormorant, kingfisher, merlin, cooper ’s hawk, kestrel, tragopan and broad-winged hawk. It is important to remember that there is no evidence that birds can transmit West Nile virus to people, but gloves should be worn when handling any dead bird or mammal.

What about domestic birds? Although chickens have been found to become infected with West Nile virus (even though they do not become ill from it), there have been no documented cases of indoor pet birds being infected. It is important to remember that birds cannot transmit West Nile virus to people.

Can my dog or cat be infected? Although West Nile virus was identified in horses on Long Island, there have been no documented cases of West Nile encephalitis in dogs (although asymptomatic infection in some dogs has been documented), and only one case documented in a New Jersey cat. It is important to remember that animals cannot transmit West Nile virus to people.

How can I protect my family and myself? To reduce the mosquito population around your home and property, reduce or eliminate all standing water:
• Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar water-holding containers.
• Remove all discarded tires on your property. Used tires are very significant mosquito breeding sites.
• Drill holes in the bottoms of recycling containers that are kept outdoors.
• Make sure roof gutters drain properly, and clean clogged gutters in the spring and fall.
• Turn over plastic wading pools and wheelbarrows when not in use.
• Change the water in birdbaths.
• Clean vegetation and debris from edges of ponds.
• Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs.
• Drain water from pool covers.
• Use landscaping to eliminate standing water that collects on your property.

Should we stay indoors? It is not necessary to limit any outdoor activities, unless there is evidence of mosquito-borne disease. However, you can and should try to reduce your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes. In addition to reducing stagnant water in your yard, make sure all windows and doors have screens, and that all screens are in good repair. If West Nile virus is found in your area:
• Minimize time spent outdoors between dusk and dawn.
• Wear shoes, socks, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt when outdoors for long periods of time, or when mosquitoes are most active.
• Consider the use of mosquito repellent, according to directions, when it is necessary to be outdoors.

What is being done in my community to control mosquitoes? The New York State Health Department, along with other state agencies, local health departments, colleges and environmental groups, has prepared a plan to address the return of West Nile virus to the Empire State, and has devised a preventive strategy to minimize the possibility of a recurrence. Local communities are implementing various control measures based on geographic location and level of risk. Individual citizens’ knowledge of the situation and participation in the process may help reduce the need for more aggressive mosquito control, such as the aerial spraying of insecticides. For more information regarding activities in Oneida County, contact the Oneida County Health Department at 315-798-6400.

What else can we do? In addition to reducing potential breeding sites on your own property, you can encourage your neighbors, local businesses and municipal agencies to do so as well. You can also work with local service, labor, religious and fraternal organizations to promote community-wide clean-up drives.


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Rome Area Mosquito Control Adulticide Application

Weather permitting, the Oneida County Department of Health is planning to make aerial applications of adulticide for its ongoing efforts to control adult mosquitoes:

Reason for Application: Public Health Threat due to West Nile Virus Activity
Time and Date of the application: 6:30pm - near dark Wednesday, September 6, 2000. If necessary, also 6:30pm - near dark, Thursday, September 7, 2000

NORTH: Interesection of Rte. 69 and Link Rd., East to Intersection of Williams Rd. and Fish Hatchery Re.

SOUTH: Rte. 26 just South of Oneida Rd., East to Rte. 69 intersection with Reber Rd.

EAST: Intersection of Williams Rd. and Fish Hatchery Rd. South to intersection of Fish Hatchery Rd and Rte 46. South to Town boundary on Old Floyd Rd.

WEST: Intersection of Rte. 69 and Link Rd., South to Rte. 26 just south of Oneida Rd.

Method of Treatment: Aerial Application from two-engine aircraft

Name of Pesticide: Anvil (sumithrin) (EPA Reg.No. 1021-1688-8329)

NOTE: Applications may be from September 6th to September 12th depending on weather conditions.

LOCAL CONTACT NUMBERS:

Oneida County Health Department 315-798-5064
Central New York Poison Control Center 315-476-4766
Department of Environmental Conservation 315-785-2263

The EPA does not require relocating or taking special precautions during mosquito control spraying, however, people may prefer to avoid or minimize exposure by:

* Staying indoors
* Keeping windows shut and air conditioners and window fans off during spraying
* Keeping children's toys indoors
* Keeping pets indoors, as well as their food, water dishes and toys

Since the effects of aerial spraying dissipate in a few hours, it is not necessary to wash off outdoor furniture or playground equipment before use, although doing so will not diminish the effectiveness of the pesticide applied.


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ANVIL and Mosquito Control Information Sheet

What is Anvil? Anvil is a pesticide product that is used to control mosquitoes in outdoor residential and recreational areas. It contains sumithrin, piperonyl butoxide and petroleum distillate. Sumithrin is a synthetic pesticide similar to a natural pesticide (pyrethrum) produced by chrysanthemum flowers. Piperonyl butoxide does not directly kill insects on its own but acts to increase the ability of sumithrin to kill insects. Other pesticide products containing these ingredients are used indoors and on pets to control insects such as fleas, ticks and ants.

Is the spraying of Anvil harmful to my health or my family’s health? Because pesticides are inherently toxic, no pesticide is absolutely risk free. The likelihood of experiencing adverse health effects as result of exposure to any pesticide, including Anvil, depends primarily on the amount of pesticide which a person contacts and the amount of time the person is in contact with that pesticide. In addition, a person’s age, sex, genetic makeup, life style and/or general health characteristics can affect their likelihood of experiencing adverse health effects as result of exposure to pesticides. Accidental, short–term exposures to very high levels of pyrethroid pesticides similar to sumithrin can affect the nervous system, causing effects such as incoordination, tremors, or tingling and numbness in areas of skin contact. Short-term exposures to high levels of petroleum distillates can cause irritation of the eye, skin, nose, throat or lung. Vomiting or central nervous system depression may occur if very high levels of petroleum distillates are ingested.

There are no studies examining whether or not the use of Anvil to control mosquitoes has caused any long-term health effects in humans. Since Anvil is applied at very low concentrations, it is unlikely that adverse health effects will occur as a result of its use to control mosquitoes. Nevertheless, some individuals may experience health effects as a result of short-term exposure to the very low levels of Anvil used to control mosquitoes. For these reasons, individuals should consider taking common sense steps to minimize their exposure to Anvil if it is applied to control mosquitoes.

Is Anvil an "endocrine disruptor"? "Endocrine disruptors" are chemicals which interfere with endocrine system function. The endocrine system consists of glands which produce hormones that act together to guide development, growth, reproduction and behavior, and to maintain normal organ function. High concentrations of sumithrin acted like estrogen (a naturally occurring hormone) when it was added to cells growing in plastic dishes in a laboratory. This suggests that sumithrin may interfere with endocrine system function in whole animals.

Although changes in thyroid hormone levels occurred in animals repeatedly exposed to some other pyrethroids, there are no specific studies examining whether or not sumithrin or the other components of Anvil, piperonyl butoxide or petroleum distillate, interfere with endocrine system function in whole animals. Our knowledge of the relationship between exposure and endocrine system effects is still developing. Because of the low application rates and rapid environmental breakdown of pyrethroids, it is unlikely that endocrine system effects would be experienced if they are used to control mosquitoes.

Are some people more likely than others to experience symptoms after they have been in contact with Anvil? Most people would not be expected to experience any symptoms. However, there could be some individuals who may be particularly sensitive to one or more constituents of Anvil, and could possibly experience short-term effects such as eye, skin, nose or throat irritation or breathing problems. Children, in particular, may be at greater risk of experiencing adverse effects due to the application of Anvil since they may have the potential for greater exposures than adults.

If I’m pregnant, can the spraying affect this pregnancy or harm my baby? Neither sumithrin nor piperonyl butoxide is likely to affect pregnancy outcomes in people as a result of spraying. Although some effects occurred in laboratory animals that were given large amounts of either sumithrin or piperonyl butoxide, these amounts far exceeded the amounts that individuals are likely to contact from the spraying with Anvil.

Should I be concerned about cancer because of the spraying program? Available information suggests that Anvil is not likely to cause cancer if people are exposed during or following the spraying program. Sumithrin did not cause cancer in rats or mice when they were fed high levels for their lifetime. Experimental studies have reported that piperonyl butoxide causes liver tumors in rats and mice when they are fed high levels of piperonyl butoxide every day for a long period of time. The amount of piperonyl butoxide ingested by animals in these studies, however, far exceeds the amount humans might be exposed to as a result of the use of Anvil to control mosquitoes. All available information thus indicates that piperonyl butoxide is unlikely to cause cancer in humans as a result of its use to control mosquitoes.

Can pets go outside during the spraying? If you want to reduce your pets’ exposure, keep them inside during the spraying. As mentioned above, products containing sumithrin and piperonyl butoxide can be applied directly on pets to control ticks and fleas.

Should I be concerned about my private swimming pool? Anvil breaks down fairly quickly in water and in sunlight. If possible, you may want to cover your pool before the spraying occurs. However, given the small concentrations of Anvil being sprayed, no special precautions or waiting periods are recommended for swimming pools.

What can I do to reduce my exposure to the insecticide? The chance of experiencing any health effects from the use of Anvil to control mosquitoes is quite low. As with any pesticide, you may want to reduce or eliminate exposures that are not necessary.

The following common sense steps will help reduce possible exposures to Anvil during spraying:

* If possible, remain inside whenever spraying takes place.
* Keep children inside during spraying and for about 1 hour after spraying.
* Close windows and doors and turn off your air conditioning (or set it to circulate indoor air) before spraying begins.
* If you have to remain outside, avoid eye contact with the spray.
* If you get Anvil spray in your eyes, immediately rinse them with water or eye drops.
* Wash exposed skin surfaces with soap and water if you come in contact with Anvil spray.
* Rinse homegrown fruits and vegetables thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.
* Cover outdoor tables and play equipment or rinse them off with soap and water after they have been sprayed.
* Bring laundry and toys inside before spraying begins (wash with soap and water if exposed to Anvil during spraying).
* Bring pets and pet food and water dishes inside, and cover ornamental fishponds to avoid direct exposure.
* Consult your physician if you think you are experiencing health effects from spraying.

Where can I get more information on Anvil? If you have additional questions about Anvil or the health effects from spraying, contact the New York State Department of Health toll-free Environmental Health Information Line at 1-800-458-1158, extension 27530. Call or Write: Oneida County Health Department 520 Seneca Street Utica, NY 13502 315-798-6400 1(800)541-0151 ext. 6400


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Aerial Spraying for Mosquitoes For West Nile Virus

NO MOSQUITO ADULTICIDE APPLICATION SPRAYING WILL BE CONDUCTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER 6, 2000. Spraying is planned to begin for Rome on September 6, 2000, weather permitting. Plans for mosquito control for Verona and Westmoreland are being developed. Further information will be issued as it becomes available.

If questions call: 798-5064 For West Nile virus information in Oneida County.


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West Nile-Positive Bird in the Town of Westmoreland

On Wednesday morning, August 30, the State Health Department reported that a dead adult King Fisher found on Main Street, East of Route 233 tested positive for the West Nile virus.

All residents are urged to take precautions to avoid mosquitoes by eliminating standing water sites around their homes and work sites, fixing screen windows and doors, and using mosquito repellent when outdoors.


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West Nile-Positive Blue Jay in the Town of Verona

It was reported on Tuesday, August 29 at 10:30 a.m., by the State Health Department, that a Blue Jay found on Sand Hill Road, Verona tested positive for the West Nile virus.

The Health Department will determine the date for an aerial application of the pesticide Anvil for the two-mile radius around Sand Hill Road after consultation with Duflo Spary-Chemical, Inc.

All residents are urged to take precautions to avoid mosquitoes by eliminating standing water sites around their homes and work sites, fixing screen windows and doors, and using mosquito repellent when outdoors.


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Positive Hawk in the City of Rome

It was reported on Thursday, August 24 at 10:30 a.m., by the State Health Department, that a hawk found near Park Drive and Mustang Road in the City of Rome tested positive for the West Nile Virus.

It is anticipated that there will be six weeks of mosquito season where precautions must be taken.


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ONEIDA COUNTY DEPT OF HEALTH PRESS RELEASE

Mosquito Spraying Will Not Hamper Community Events

Oneida County Health Department announced today that needed mosquito aerial spraying in response to a West Nile-positive crow found on Marlboro Road in South Utica will not effect community events such as Our Lady of Lourdes annual fund-raiser, the Utica Blue Sox game or Utica Monday Night.

On Tuesday, August 22, it was reported that a second crow tested positive for the West Nile Virus. Aerial spraying for mosquitoes took place in the City of Utica, Towns of New Hartford and Whitestown and the Villages of New York Mills, Yorkville and Whitesboro.


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Marcy Spraying to Continue

The Health Department and Duflo Spray-Chemical, Inc. announced today that certain roads within the radius to be aerial sprayed Tuesday, August 22 were not completed due to darkness and is scheduled for Thursday, August 24 - weather permitting.

Areas predominately West of power lines in the Town of Marcy near the intersections of Luke and Coombs Roads and Cavanaugh and Hayes Road are scheduled to be sprayed Thursday beginning about 6:30 p.m. lasting about one-half hour. Residents in those areas are encouraged to follow instructions from the first spraying.


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Spraying for West Nile in Utica

Mosquito adulticide aerial spraying will be performed in the City of Utica early next week, weather permitting, due to the positive result of a dead crow for the West Nile Virus.

Health officials were notified Tuesday, August 22, 2000, by the New York State Department of Health that a dead crow found near Marlboro Road in Utica tested positive for the West Nile Virus. In response, the Health Department and County officials are moving ahead with the implementation of a plan to spray insecticide in and around the surrounding area.

To date, 15 of 49 birds sent for testing from Oneida County have come back negative and two have come back positive; one in the Town of Marcy, Wednesday, August 16th and one in the City of Utica today.

The West Nile Virus appears to be a Northeast problem. This year the virus has been found in over 200 birds in over 20 counties.


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Health Department Moves Ahead with Plan to Spray

Oneida County Health Department officials are moving ahead with plans to aerial spray insecticide within a two-mile radius of where a dead crow tested positive for the West Nile Virus.

Health officials were notified Wednesday, August 16 by the State Health Department about the infected bird near Luke and Glass Factory Roads in the Town of Marcy.

Duflo Spray- Chemical, Inc., who has done aerial spraying for clients such as Disney World, will aerial spray at $3.50 per acre with the insecticide Anvil.

Residents are urged to take precautions to avoid mosquitoes by eliminating standing water sites around homes, fixing screen doors and the using mosquito repellent when outside.


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Health Officials Prepare Plans for Mosquito Spraying

Health officials met with an aerial application company this morning to develop a plan to spray insecticides within a 2-mile radius of where a dead crow tested positive for the West Nile Virus.

Health officials, who were notified Wednesday from the State Health Department about the infected bird near Luke and Glass Factory Roads in the Town of Marcy, are now working with Duflo Spray-Chemical, Inc., specialist in mosquito, black fly and forest insect control.

Oneida County is not alone in its battle against the West Nile Virus. This year the West Nile Virus has been found in 202 birds in 23 counties including four in Upstate New York.

State Health officials consider the insecticide, Anvil, non-toxic and effective. Information concerning the West Nile Virus and Anvil is available from the New York State Health Department. Oneida County Health officials and the applicator are in the process of: Preparing flight and safety plans, including the distribution of information about the insecticide, Anvil, to area fire and police departments, certification with FAA and identifying possible flight obstructions and open water.


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Status Report for West Nile Virus in Oneida County
September 7, 2000

I. Bird Surveillance
II. Mosquito Surveillance
III. Human Surveillance
IV. Control Efforts
V. Education

  1. Bird Surveillance

A. Policy and Procedure Issues

Based upon the recommendations of the New York State Department of Health, the Oneida County Health Department has been submitting dead Crows, Bluejays, and Hawks since June 2000. Other birds have been submitted, often because identification of the birds was difficult.

1. Submission Results – Table 1

Week 2000

Reported Crows

Submitted Crows

Positive Crows

Negative Crows

5/28-9/7

131

55

2

22

Reported Other Birds
Submitted Other Birds
Positive Other Birds
Negative Other Birds
926
34
3
10

 

II. Mosquito Surveillance

A. Policy and Procedure Issues

The Oneida County Health Department has been conducting surveillance activities for EEEV since the 1970’s. With the recent introduction of WNV in New York State, the mosquito pools submitted for EEEV testing are also tested for WNV. However, the NYSDOH has limited the total number of mosquito pools for Oneida County to 10 pools per week. This would include all surveillance activities EEEV and WNV. Regular submission of pools for EEEV surveillance in western Oneida County for 2000, averaged 6 pools per week.

B. Submission Results – Table 2

2000

Submitted Pools*

Positive Pools

Negative Pools

Pending Pools

5/28-9/7

60

0

16

44

* Total pools submitted for 2000 EEEV/WNV Surveillance Activities

III. Human Surveillance

A. Policy and Procedure Issues

Surveillance activities in Oneida County are limited to communications with hospitals and physicians regarding submission of samples for suspect WNV cases. Certain NYSDOH criteria must be met in order for the Oneida County Health Department to authorize the submission of samples to the state lab.

B. Submission Results – Table 3

Week 2000

Suspect Cases*

Total Submissions**

Positive Cases

Negative Cases

Pending Cases

5/28-9/2

4

5

0

2

3

* Suspect cases meet established NYSDOH criteria.

** Additional submission, not included in suspect cases does not meet NYSDOH criteria for suspect case.

  1. Control Efforts

Policy and Procedure Issues

Based upon the NYSDOH and CDC recommendations for the response to WNV isolations within New York State, the Oneida County Health Department began utilizing aerial spraying of adulticides for the control of adult mosquitoes. Other control measures include the reduction of mosquito breeding habitats throughout the county. Unfortunately, this habitat reduction is limited by public assistance and natural habitat presence. Larvicide applications are useful when habitats have been identified and permits have been obtained.

Applicator Information

Duflo Spray-Chemical, Inc. New Bremen, NY 13412, Jeffrey T. Duflo, President. This company specializes in mosquito, black fly and forest insect control throughout the nation. Using a small, twin engine Aztec aircraft and using a Global Positioning System, Mr. Duflo is able to fly straight lines approximately 600 feet apart from one side of the spray are to the other. Using this satellite driven system, Mr. Duflo is able to be quite precise in his application of pesticides. In addition, he is able to eliminate the chances of spraying areas more than once.

Pesticide Information

ANVIL, a synthetic pyrethroid is used to control the adult mosquito population. The product ANVIL contains three different chemicals – Sumethrin, Piperonyl Butoxide, and a mineral oil. The chemical MSDS sheets indicate general information, ingredients, physical data, fire and explosion hazard data, health hazard data, reactivity data, environmental procedures and special protection information for the concentrated form of the product. This information is provided by employers when the chemical is being handled, stored or used by employees. The label for ANVIL indicates certain precautionary information and directions for use. The proper dilution levels are provided for different types of application. The dilution rates given on the label are designed to show the proper concentrations of the product that would ensure proper and appropriate use of the product. The product is used under optimal weather conditions (ideal conditions of temperature >62 degrees for the time of application, daylight - near dusk but enough time to complete most if not all of the spray area, winds < 10 mph, no rain in forecast for at least 3-4 hours).

Spraying Information – Table 4

Response to Bird

Application Area

Application Dates

Total Acreage

TotalCost (Estimate)*

State-Aid
Reimbursement

Crow

Marcy 1

8/22 & 24/2000

~9,700

$33,950

$16,975

Crow

Greater Utica Area

8/28, 29, 30/2000

~32,725

$114,538

$57,269

Hawk

Rome 1

Postponed Indefinitely**

~20,230

 

 

Blue Jay

Verona 1

Postponed Indefinitely**

~10,580

 

 

Kingfisher

Westmoreland 1

Postponed Indefinitely**

~8,005

   

Public Health

Oriskany 1

Postponed Indefinitely**

~4,455

   

* Cost is based upon $3.50 per acre for aerial application of ANVIL.

** Postponed indefinitely based upon forecasted seasonal weather conditions and reduced risk of infection due to reduced mosquito activity.

DEC Compliance

Because the NYS Commissioner of Health declared Oneida County is in a state of Public Health Threat because of the isolation of WNV in a crow in Marcy, many requirements established in DEC law are temporarily waived. However, the requirements for proper notification of the public are not waived, though time frame limits are loosened. For future use of pesticides in response to the public health threat of WNV in Oneida County, applications will need to be completed and permits issued. Although the widespread application of pesticides throughout the county is allowed under DEC law during this emergency situation, open water areas, streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, etc… cannot have adulticide applied if the open water is visible. In addition, high-risk areas are also avoided (hospitals, drinking water reservoirs).

Other Application Information

Some local municipalities have routine nuisance mosquito control programs that include aerial and ground applications of larvicides and/or adulticides. Sylvan Beach and Sherrill in Oneida County, and the City of Oneida conduct routine control applications.

V. Education

  1. Educational Materials

Educational materials have been developed by the NYSDOH and have been adapted for use in Oneida County. With each isolation of WNV in a bird submitted to the NYSDOH, educational information sessions have been conducted and educational materials have been distributed in the affected areas (often to local libraries and places of public assembly).



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business futurist, professional speaker, marketing strategist, Marmel Consulting, marmel, sales software, author, Marlene Brown, CSP
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& TechnoTouch Marketing
53 White Street, Suite 305
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Tel: (315) 853-1318
E-mail: marlene

business futurist, professional speaker, marketing strategist, Marmel Consulting, marmel, sales software, author, Marlene Brown, CSP
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